Dominican fried chicken! (“Pica pollo”)

Dominican “Pica Pollo”

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Hello my dear friends and fellow foodies!

Today I bring you a very popular recipe in Dominican street food culture:“pica pollo”. (which is basically Dominican street fried chicken)

Dominicans love chicken (as a thousand and one recipes involving chicken published so far show) but it has also become a convenient, easy, economic and quick way to have lunch while on the road or to just avoid the kitcken for one day.

Chicharrones de pollo

Dominican pica pollo generally passed through flour which makes this coating keep all the marvelous seasoning we use.

Today, “pica pollo” is probably the most popular street food in Dominican Republic. 

Chicharrones de pollo

Ingredients for a Dominican “Pica Pollo”

  • A 3 pound chicken (you may adjust to suit your family size or event)
  • 1 tbsp. garlic paste.
  • 1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce.
  • 3 lemons.
  • Wheat white flour.
  • Salt, black and red pepper (red pepper is not traditional but it adds a “punch”) and a bit of oregano.
  • 1 chicken bouillon cube.

Preparing a Dominican “Pica Pollo”

Wash your chicken and season with a mix of all the ingredients. If the lemons were not too juicy maybe you can add some more lemon juice, as the acid enhances all other flavors.

El Fogoncito

The meat should be mildly wet so that it takes well the flour.

Fry in abundant oil and let them cook until golden brown. (As in the pics)

Be careful not to overheat the oil as that will lead to the outside being ready while the inside is still raw. Hot oil should not smoke. If it’s smoking, turn off and let it cool and start over a bit later.

Hope you enjoy! I think I’ll go and prepare some of this with a pack of drumsticks I have in the fridge.

Arturo

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The only sausage guide you will ever need

Originally posted on Eatocracy:

America’s Test Kitchen is a real 2,500 square foot test kitchen located just outside of Boston that is home to more than three dozen full-time cooks and product testers. Our mission is simple: to develop the absolute best recipes for all of your favorite foods. To do this, we test each recipe 30, 40, sometimes as many as 70 times, until we arrive at the combination of ingredients, technique, temperature, cooking time, and equipment that yields the best, most-foolproof recipe. America’s Test Kitchen’s online cooking school is based on nearly 20 years of test kitchen work in our own facility, on the recipes created for Cook’s Illustrated magazine, and on our two public television cooking shows.

All the world loves a sausage, so whether you grew up in Brooklyn or Bologna, you probably have a favorite. Here are some of ours:

Frankfurter: Top Dog

The genuine article, the Frankfurter…

View original 1,097 more words

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7 greatest fats!

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Dominican Heat’s 2013 review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 25,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 9 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Dominican leave cakes (“Pasteles en Hoja”)

Dominican “pasteles en hoja” recipe

Hello friends and fellow foodies!

I had shared a recipe for Dominican leave cakes or “Pasteles en hoja” some time ago but the time is right (this is a traditional Christmas recipe) to revise it and share.

“Pasteles en hoja” are very traditional during Christmas time (for those of you confused, the “season” in Dominican Republic started about a month ago and extends well into January. So yes, we’re in Christmas!

Pasteles are very similar in looks to Mexican “Tamales” and to many other wrapped treasures in Hispanic cuisine. This is a good “template” recipe for you to play with. It’s an amazing recipe to start with. It took me years to get it, due to the traditional secrecy of Dominican cooks.

Once you prepare and taste it, you may can adjust it as follows to match your own taste:

  1. if you want them harder, increase the plantains.
  2. If you want them softer, increase the green bananas.
  3. if you want them sweeter, increase the ripe plantains. Less sweet, reduce the ripe plantains.
  4. If you want a more gourmet taste, increase the white yautia and the green banana while compensating by reducing the other ingredients.

Ingredients for the “Pasteles en hoja” mix.

  1. 12 green bananas.
  2. 1 ripe banana.
  3. 4 green plantains.
  4. 3 ripe plantains.
  5. 2 lb. white yautía.
  6. 2 lb. yellow yautía.
  7. ½ lb. Auyama (pumpkin)
  8. 2 liters of whole milk.
  9. 1 package of bouillon cubes. (Chicken)
  10. 1 spoonful of garlic paste.
  11. Bija and oil.
  12. 1 spoonful of sour orange juice.
  13. Salt.

Ingredients for the filling 

  1. 1 ½ pounds of ground meat. (beef)
  2. 1 pounds of ground meat (pork)
  3. 3 boxes of raisins.
  4. 2 cubanela peppers.
  5. 2 big onions.
  6. 2 bell peppers
  7. 2 bouillon cubes.
  8. 5 spoonfuls of tomato paste.
  9. 3 spoonfuls of garlic paste.
  10. A cilantrico bush.
  11. A leek bush.
  12. Paprika, pepper and salt to taste.

Additional ingredients 

1. banana leaves (To wrap. Banana leaves add aroma and flavor)

2. Cord.

The banana leaves should be passed through fire so that they become flexible to use as wraps.

Cut the cord in pieces to tie the “pasteles”.

Preparation of the meat for pasteles en hoja

The meat is cooked with all the ingredients and it is left very dry.

Preparation for the pasteles dough. 

Peel and grate all the pasteles dough ingredients. Then blend them with milk so that it becomes a creamy paste but not too watery. Season with the garlic, the bouillon cubes and the salt.

Fry the bija in oil to extract its colors. Use the oil to mix in the dough. It will add the traditional color.

Extend the banana leaves in sufficiently big squares to create pasteles of medium size. Toss a quantity of some 5 spoonfuls (if they you have one of those big serving spooks one would do) and a tablespoon of meat. Add some three raisins and a pepper piece and wrap. Tie it smoothly and take it to the freezer.

To eat them. Toss them in boiling water with salt for about 40 minutes. Take out, untie and enjoy. People eat them with cátchup and with spicy sauce. But the first taste should always only pastel, to taste the pastel and its filling properly.

Don’t forget to subscribe and continue enjoying with el fogoncito this Christmas!

Arturo

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Fried plantain chips

Fried plantain chips

(Chicharritas, platanitos, platanutres or mariquitas)

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Hello friends and fellow foodies!

Fried plantain chips are extremely popular in the Caribbean and possibly the most popular in the Dominican Republic. They get called different names depending of the island. platanitos or chicharritas in Dominican Republic, platanutres in Puerto Rico and mariquitas or chicharritas also in Cuba.

fried plantain chips (chicharritas, platanitos, mariquitas or platanutres)

fried plantain chips (chicharritas, platanitos, mariquitas or platanutres)

Ingredients and preparation is extremely easy.

Today is a special day. We celebrate our most recent book: “Dominican Spice”. We also celebrate getting to 5,000 likes in our Facebook page.

So today we share the recipe and the video we have prepared just for you!

Not only that but you may download “Dominican Spice” from Amazon FREE today and tomorrow. To add even more, you may download ALL of our cookbooks, in English or Spanish today and tomorrow.

 

Fried plantain chips

  • Plantains.
  • Vegetable oil.
  • Salt.

Preparing fried plantain chips

Peel and slice your plantains. Heat your oil until it’s very hot but not smoking hot.

Fry until they’re crunchy.

We have them with salt, ketchup or fried sausage or longaniza.

You may download both editions of our latest book for free from Amazon.

El sazón de la cocina dominicana and Dominican Spice

El sazon de la cocina dominicana & Dominican Spice

Click on the images below to go to Amazon

 “the best Dominican desserts”

Click para ver en Amazon

Dominican Spice

 “the best Dominican desserts”

Click for Dominican Spice in Amazon

We may not do this frequently so take advantage today and tomorrow. It might be the last chance this year.

Please don’t forget to leave us your reviews in Amazon

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Dominican Spice!

   Dominican Spice

El sazon de la cocina dominicana & Dominican Spice

                                                     El sazón de la cocina dominicana & Dominican Spice

Hello friends and fellow foodies!

For those of you that have been around for a while it won’t come as a surprise that after some time publishing less frequently than usual we bring you another project.

For some time we have struggled trying to explain Dominican herbs and spices. Trying to have a tool where anyone could quickly have a look at and be able to compare herbs and spices motivated us to come up with “Dominican Spice” (The English edition of “El sazón de la cocina dominicana”)

It’s a photo glossary, with HD pics and scientific names, featuring the main herbs and spices in Dominican cuisine. It should be useful for those trying to learn Dominican cooking and even for those who are curious about it.

The Spanish edition might be found in Amazon clicking on the image below.

 “the best Dominican desserts”

Click to see in Amazon

“Dominican Spice” is also available, you may click below.

Dominican Spice

 “the best Dominican desserts”

Click for Dominican Spice in Amazon

From the back cover

“…Dominican traditional food is a food of balances and counter-balances. Food that although artisanal and many times rudimentary, surprisingly reaches what professionals see as perfection: it’s harmonious food. Heavily relying on natural herbs and spices it reaches levels of impressive culinary pureness….” 

Finally, as a special “treat” for our fans and friends, just this weekend (Friday and Saturday only) you will be able to download ALL of our cooking, recipes and food related books from Amazon for FREE. We only ask that after checking them, you leave us your honest reviews. Reviews helps us promote our work as well as other buyers in making their decision and identifying the right product.

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Deep fried Dominican squash (auyama)!

Deep fried Dominican Squash (pumpkin)

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Hello friends and fellow foodies!

Today I share a very simple and tasty recipe. You may serve as a side dish to many dishes, but a Dominican would probably think of fried salami, longaniza, sausage, etc.

Dominican squash

Dominican squash

Ingredients for deep fried Dominican squash

  • Dominican squash
  • Water
  • Garlic
  • Black pepper
  • Red pepper
  • Salt
Dominican squash

Dominican squash

Directions for preparing fried squash

Peel and cut your squash in cubes.

Mash some garlic. Fill a bowl with water and add some salt and the garlic. Put the water in a pot and let it boil. When boiling add the squash cubes and let it boil for 5 minutes. It it’s very soft squash you might have to take out earlier. You don’t want it to soft before frying.

Dominican squash

Dominican squash

In hot oil, but not too hot (it should not be smoking hot) fry until hard on the outside. Take out and sprinkle red and black pepper.

Enjoy!

Arturo

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